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Profiles-Interviews

The Launch of the Dermatology Educational Resource: Interview With the Editor-in-Chief Dr. Charles Lynde

The Launch of the Dermatology Educational Resource: Interview With the Editor-in-Chief Dr. Charles Lynde

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Charles Lynde, MD, FRCPC
Editor-in-Chief for the Dermatology Educational Resource @HealthPlexus and the Journal of Current Clinical Care.

Following on the footsteps of the recent announcement of the launch of the Dermatology Educational Resource, www.HealthPlexus.net recently interviewed Dr. Charles Lynde who was appointed as Editor-in-Chief for the newly re-focused educational channel. Dr. Barry Goldlist asked Dr. Lynde a few questions about the format and the plans for this project.

The Launch of the Dementia Educational Resource: Interview With the Editor-in-Chief Dr. Michael Gordon

The Launch of the Dementia Educational Resource: Interview With the Editor-in-Chief Dr. Michael Gordon

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Michael Gordon, MD, MSc, FRCPC, FACP, FRCPEdin
Geriatrician, ethicist, educator, speaker, author.

Following on the footsteps of the recent announcement of the launch of the Dementia Educational Resource, www.HealthPlexus.net recently interviewed Dr. Michael Gordon who was appointed as Editor-in-Chief for the newly re-focused educational channel. Dr. Barry Goldlist asked Dr. Gordon a few questions about the format and the plans for this project.

The Canadian Conference on Dementia: Past, Present and Future

The Canadian Conference on Dementia: Past, Present and Future

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An interview of Dr. Barry Goldlist with Dr. Ron Keren, the founder and chair of CCD
 


Dr. Ron Keren, MD, FRCPC
Dr. Ron Keren was born and raised in Vancouver and received his medical degree at the University of Tel-Aviv, Israel. Dr. Keren completed his residency training in Psychiatry at the University of Maryland, where he also completed a clinical fellowship in Geriatric Psychiatry.


 

Hope for Home Care

Hope for Home Care

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Hope for Home Care

To meet Ann Keane is to recognize one's self-imposed limitations. How daunting a task to leave a life behind, kiss children goodbye, and decide, one small woman, to run across Canada? Across Canada, no less?! How many of us would be willing to make that sacrifice?

Incredibly, this woman found the courage, and is currently in the middle of an epic journey, in an effort to raise awareness and funds for home care and long-term care in Canada. She is also running to publicize the Hope Foundation of Alberta, a non-profit organization that is dedicated to understanding the role that hope plays in human life.

Ann began her journey on April 19th in Newfoundland. So far she has logged over 5000 km, passing through the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba, and is now on her way through Saskatchewan. She hopes to be in British Columbia by late September.

Has it been difficult? You betcha! In her online diary, Ann has described her pitting edema, excruciating fatigue, black toenails, miserable blisters, the heat and constant battles with her arch nemeses, mosquitoes, or as she calls them, 'squiters.'

Why has she chosen to do it, and why has she chosen to raise funds for home care? Ann is a nurse with over twenty years experience in long-term care and home care. She is the former director of a home care program in Alberta, ran a 200 bed auxiliary hospital, and until the beginning of this run, was a member of provincial and national health care boards. She is also a woman frustrated and angered by the token government attention and funding to this important area. In her own words: "I was tired of being a warrior, and nothing ever changing."

Credit Greg Laychak

According to a VHA Home Health care survey published in 2001, in Ontario 82% of the population is concerned about having access to home health care support as they age. Eighty-three percent of respondents to the same survey, with parents who were not currently receiving home care or institutional elder care services, fear a shortage of professional home care workers as the baby boom population retires.1

As a recent Census report shows, they have plenty to fear. Currently, over 13% of the population is 65 years of age or older, and the fastest-growing segment of the population is that aged 80 or older. The over 80 age group has increased by 41.2% between 1991 and 2001.2

In a 1988 US survey, older adults with long-term care needs stated a clear preference for home health care.3 However, currently only 4% of the national health care budget is spent on home care. Moreover, poor morale and recruitment problems are contributing to a shortage of home care workers, who are paid on average 30% less than are their colleagues who work in more formal facilities. They also face strict limitations with their time. How is one to preserve the dignity of an elderly client, when forced to enter an apartment, bathe the client and exit, all in the space of half an hour?

Does Ann believe in her cause? Absolutely. She is completely committed to the challenge, and is determined to make this journey count. That is not to say that she has not been discouraged or disappointed. She has periodically faced an upsetting lack of media interest in her cause. For better or worse, apparently there are many people biking or blading across the country to raise money or awareness for their chosen plight. While it is heartening that so many are willing to make these sacrifices, it makes it more difficult to raise funds for such an important cause. Especially when raising those funds involves running between 50 and 80 kilometres a day!

Regardless, she runs on. Ann is nothing if not persistent, and she clearly believes deeply in her cause. If nothing else, she knows that with this run she has given absolutely everything she can and has held nothing in reserve. She hopes that this will be enough to effect a change. Let us hope that she is right!

Ann Keane can be reached at her website at www.powerofpeoplerun.com. If you are interested in donating to her cause, you can click on the donation button on the website or phone or email her Donation Manager, John Duke at (780) 469-5094 or johnduke@telusplanet.net.

Sources

  1. VHA Home Healthcare. Ontarians worried about inadequate home care for seniors [Press release]. VHA Home Healthcare, April 2001, www.vha.ca/news/press.htm.
  2. Statistics Canada. Census Report. www.statcan.ca/english/IPS/Data/97F0024XIE2001001.htm
  3. National Survey of Caregivers: Summary of Findings. National Opinion Research Center Chicago, IL: October 1988.

 

 

 

Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders)

Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders)

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Bringing medical aid and international recognition to the vulnerable populations around the globe

Lilia Malkin, MSc
Contributing Author,
Geriatrics & Aging

In today's turbulent economic and political climate, it is often easy to focus on the headlines and statistics, and to neglect the individual human faces behind the facts and maps. Surrounded by seemingly, never-ending references to violence and disaster in news reports, and in popular culture, our society often appears virtually desensitized to the masses who are suffering around the globe. Fortunately, we are also frequently reminded that there are thousands of individuals who are committed to the humanitarian goals of helping those in dire need of assistance. One such reminder came in the fall of 1999, when Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) received worldwide acclaim and recognition by being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their thirty-year effort to aid the planet's populations in distress.1,2 For the past three decades, the volunteers of MSF (known to the English-speaking world as 'Doctors Without Borders') have been at the sites of natural- and human-made disasters, making a valiant attempt to help the wounded and the vulnerable.

Edmonton Protocol: The Pride of Canada

Edmonton Protocol: The Pride of Canada

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Julia Krestow, BSc, MSc
Freelance writer
Geriatrics & Aging

It is perhaps not since Banting and Best's discovery of insulin in 1921, that a discovery in diabetic research has held such potential for the treatment of this crippling disease. In May of this year, the University of Alberta achieved instant fame when a research team, led by Dr. Ray Rajotte, announced that it had successfully freed seven diabetics from their daily insulin injections. The team, which consisted of Dr. Jonathan Lakey and Dr. Greg Korbutt, and also included the transplant surgeon Dr. James Shapiro, reported their results at the American Society of Transplant Surgeons and the American Transplantation Society in Chicago. Dr. Shapiro has succeeded in transplanting donor insulin-producing, pancreatic islet cells into seven people, all of whom had, prior to the study, required up to 15 self-injected insulin shots on a daily basis.

Diabetes affects more than 2.25 million Canadians and is subdivided into two categories; Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and occurs when the pancreas is unable to produce insulin. Type II diabetes, which accounts for approximately 90% of the cases and usually develops in adulthood, occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body does not use the insulin effectively.

Antiglutamate Agents Hold Promise for Control of Hallucinations in PD

Antiglutamate Agents Hold Promise for Control of Hallucinations in PD

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Interview with Dr. Michel Panisset

Dr. Michel Panisset is the Director of the Movement Disorder Clinic at the McGill Centre for Studies in Aging, and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University. He specializes in neurology and movement disorders and is particularly interested in Parkinson's Disease. He is also a member of the Parkinson Study Group. Dr. Panisset kindly agreed to share his knowledge and views on the best methods to control hallucinations in patients suffering from PD.

Q: Do hallucinations constitute a big problem for your patients who suffer from Parkinson's disease? How do these hallucinations affect a patient's wellbeing and daily functioning? Do they affect a patient's compliance with medication?

A: Approximately 20 to 40% of patients with Parkinson's Disease experience hallucinations. When we look at our own data, we find that this number is closer to 40%. So, it is a very significant problem. Hallucinations usually start in patients suffering from a more advanced stage of the disease, who have greater problems with cognition and require more medications. We do not see a strong effect on compliance in this particular subpopulation of patients. Typically, when a patient suffers from cognitive or psychiatric problems, medications are administered with the help of a caregiver.

Ground-Breaking Work in Stem Cell Research

Ground-Breaking Work in Stem Cell Research

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An Interview with Dr. Derek van der Kooy about His Recent Work on Retinal Stem Cells

Kimby N. Barton, MSc
Assistant Editor
Geriatrics & Aging

In August, this year, the National Institutes of Health generated a firestorm of controversy when they released their new guidelines allowing scientists to use stem cells derived from human embryos for their research. Reactions varied from great praise from the publicly funded Ameri-can scientific community, to a papal condemnation of the action as 'not morally acceptable'.

The various reactions aside, it is widely recognized that stem cell therapy may be one of the only avenues available for treating a number of neurodegenerative disorders, spinal cord injury, and diabetes. The recent success of the 'Edmonton Protocol', which relies on the injection of pancreatic islet cells into a donor pancreas, has raised the possibility of a 'cure' for diabetes. Unfortunately the limited availability of current donors, and the need for two or more pancreases per patient, raise the spectre of a long waiting list of people desperately hoping for a donated organ. One means of overcoming this organ limitation is to develop a renewable line of pancreatic stem cells.

Several articles in this issue offer discussions on the limited success of treatments for such age-related eye diseases as macular degeneration and glaucoma.