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Wandering: Clues to Effective Management

Wandering: Clues to Effective Management

Teaser: 


Donna L. Algase, PhD, RN, FAAN, FGSA, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Wandering is among the most challenging behaviours associated with dementia. While research is progressing toward a fuller understanding of this phenomenon, the basis for deriving effective and tested interventions has not been fully developed. In this paper, wandering is defined from multiple perspectives, and its various outcomes and risks are discussed. Putative causes of wandering are summarized. Finally, an approach to aid clinicians in discovering effective strategies for managing an individual’s wandering is presented.
Key words: wandering, dementia, assessment, intervention, primary care.

Approaches to Treating the Older Substance User

Approaches to Treating the Older Substance User

Teaser: 

Randy Harris, MSW, RSW, Mental Health Therapist, Community Geriatric Mental Health Services, Calgary Health Region, Calgary, AB.

Substance abuse experienced by older clients is frequently seen in medical practices. This article reviews approaches to assessing and treating older adults, including practical ideas for conducting interviews with older clients. A philosophical stance that recognizes a client’s readiness to change is also discussed.

Key words:
older adults, substance use, stages of change, assessment, intervention.

Identification of Nutrition Problems in Older Patients

Identification of Nutrition Problems in Older Patients

Teaser: 

Heather H. Keller, RD, PhD, Associate Professor, Dept. Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON.

Although the prevalence of malnutrition and, specifically, undernutrition are unknown among Canadian seniors, nutritional risk has been identified as a common problem. As nutritional risk can lead to malnutrition and all of its sequelae, efforts are needed to identify nutrition problems early in their course to improve the quality of life of seniors. The following article provides a variety of approaches for identifying nutritional problems, from simple indicators to a simplified and standardized nutritional assessment. Suggestions also are provided on how the practitioner can seek assistance with intervening and helping the senior to overcome these problems.
Key words: nutrition, older adults, screening, intervention, risk, weight.