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Common Lumps and Bumps in Children: A Colour-coded Differential

Common Lumps and Bumps in Children: A Colour-coded Differential

Members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada may claim one non-certified credit per hour for this non-certified educational program.

www.cfpc.ca/mainpro-manual
Teaser: 

Shahana Nathwani, BHK, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.
Joseph M Lam, MD, FRCP(C), Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Associate Member, Department of Dermatology and Skin Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.

Abstract
Many conditions present as 'lumps and bumps' in the pediatric population. Some follow a benign course and can be safely observed with parental education and reassurance. Others require definitive therapy or carry the potential for serious complications. Understanding and recognizing the different lesions will help guide the care, counseling and management of patients with these common 'lumps and bumps'. This review presents and categorizes common pediatric cutaneous lesions according to colours as a tool to help the general practitioner recognize and remember these lesions.
Keywords: benign; pediatric; tumours; vascular; hemangioma; nevus.

The Efficacy and Safety of Tamsulosin for the Medical Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

The Efficacy and Safety of Tamsulosin for the Medical Treatment of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

Teaser: 

Levent Ozdal, MD, Research Fellow, Department of Urology, McGill University, Montreal, QC.
Simon Tanguay, MD, FRCS(C), Associate Professor, Department of Urology, McGill University, Montreal, QC.

Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common benign neoplasm in aging men. Although microscopic evidence of BPH occurs in 80% of men who are at least 80 years old, clinical enlargement of the gland only occurs in half of all men in this age group. Furthermore, symptomatic disease only develops in about half of men with clinically enlarged prostate glands.1

Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) of BPH can be obstructive or irritative in nature. Most symptoms occur and progress slowly in aging men. The treatment of BPH is usually indicated once patients develop either moderate or severe symptoms, or in the presence of complications due to bladder obstruction. Complications of BPH due to chronic obstruction include recurrent urinary tract infection, bladder stones, incontinence, gross hematuria, urinary retention or renal failure.

The aim of BPH treatment should include improving or eradicating symptoms, reversing the complications of the disease and preventing additional sequelae. Treatment is typically based on the severity of symptoms and patient preference.