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Editor's Note, Volume 5 Issue 5

D’Arcy Little, MD, CCFP, FRCPC
Medical Director, JCCC and HealthPlexus.NET

Iam pleased to introduce the next issue of the Journal of Current Clinical Care for your reading pleasure.

Drs. Jennifer Smitten and Joseph M. Lam offer a case study A Scaly Periorbital Rash in a Preschool-Aged Boy. A diagnosis of eczematous id reaction to molluscum contagiosum was made in a 4-year old boy who presented with an 8-month history of a pruritic scaly eruption around his right eye. While up to 40% of cases of molluscum contagiosum may have an associated eczematous dermatitis, these are often under-recognized or misdiagnosed.

In their article Vertebral Metastatic Disease: A Practice Guideline for the General Practitioner, Drs. Michael S. Taccone, Markian Pahuta, Darren M. Roffey, Mohammed F. Shamji, and Eugene K. Wai, describe vertebral metastatic disease that afflicts a significant proportion of cancer patients, most commonly those with breast and lung disease. Specific therapy for the vertebral metastatic disease can include pharmacologic therapy to deliver analgesia, steroids, bisphosphonate, anti-neoplastic or radiation therapy as either primary or adjuvant therapy and surgical intervention for mechanical or neurologic instability.

In his blog Digoxin for the Control of Congestive Heart Failure Symptoms in Palliative Care, Dr. Michael Gordon, from the Baycrest Centre of Geriatric Care in Toronto, examines the use of digoxin in long-term care where health care practitioners are often confronted with late-stage and terminal heart failure, it is worth considering digoxin as part of the palliative symptom management repertoire.

Drs. Pradeep Shenoy, Sohail Abdul Malik, and Pooja Chodankar, offer a case study on Bipolar Electrofulgration with Endoscopic Approach in Allergic Turbinates. Arrays of treatment modalities have been experimented with and have yielded a diversity of results. Here is a synopsis of the use of endoscopic bipolar cauterization of middle and inferior turbinates in cases of allergic rhinitis, a treatment which achieves superior results in comparison with other therapeutic options.

For our Medical Narratives section Dr. Michael Gordon, from the Baycrest Centre of Geriatric Care in Toronto, draws from his personal experiences and delights the reader with Tales of Heartache and Woe.

I hope you enjoy this latest edition. Please consider commenting or submitting an article of your own.